The sinners conuersion. By Henrie Smith
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The sinners conuersion. By Henrie Smith by Henry Smith

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Published by Printed [by Peter Short] for William Leake, and are to be solde at his shop in Paules Church-yard, at the signe of the Crane in At London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sermons, English -- 16th century.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesSinners conversion, Sinners conversion.
SeriesEarly English books, 1475-1640 -- 354:2.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[32] p.
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18583534M

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Smith, Henry, ? The sinners conuersion. By Henrie Smith (At London: Printed [by Peter Short] for William Leake, and are to be solde at his shop in Paules Church-yard, at the signe of the Crane, ) (HTML at EEBO TCP) Smith, Henry, ? Sixe sermons. In the eye of the beholder: tales of Egyptian life from the writings of Yusuf Idris / by: Idrīs, Yūsuf. Published: (). The sinners conuersion. By Henrie Smith (At London: Printed [by Peter Short] for William Leake, and are to be solde at his shop in Paules Church-yard, at the signe of the Crane, ), . The sinners conuersion. By Henrie Smith: Smith, Henry, ? / [] The sinfull mans search: or seeking of God. Preached by Henrie Smith, and published according to a true corrected copie, sent by the author to an honorable ladie: Smith, Henry, ? / [] The sermons of Maister Henrie Smith gathered into one volume.

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